Costa Rica Set To Become The Worlds First Plastic-Free And Carbon-Free Country By 2021

Costa Rica volcano
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Costa Rica is in the top 5 of countries that are leading the way into renewable resources. It might seem small but it has a really big environmental impact. Since 2014 the country’s energy has been coming from 99% renewable sources, and it has been running on 100% renewable energy for over two months twice in the last two years. Then, since June 2017 they have been set on eradicating single-use plastic by 2021. The first be the first country in the world to do this. And most recently, in the summer of 2018, the country announced its aims to become completely carbon-neutral by the year 2021 – The first completely carbon-free country in the whole world.

“Basing [electricity] generation on renewable resources allows the country to achieve one of the lowest ratios of greenhouse gas emissions to electrical consumption on the planet,” the Costa Rican Electricity Institute (ICE) indicated in a statement.

Over the past 4 years, Costa Rica has generated all but 1 percent of its electricity from renewable sources such as its rivers, volcanoes, wind and solar power. The hydroelectric plant on the Reventazón River, on the Caribbean slope, began operations in 2016. It’s the largest plant of its kind in Central America. They also have seven wind turbine plants, six hydroelectric plants and a solar plant. A statement from ICE indicated that ¾ of renewable energy came from hydroelectric plants using river water; the rest was geothermal and wind power, with biomass then solar power constituting the smallest percentage.

Read full article on Intelligentliving.co

The Best Beaches on St. Barth, According to Locals

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In the Caribbean paradise of St. Barth, there are no less than 14 beaches spread across the enclave, each radiating with its own singular character and charm.

From isolated stretches of sand to entertainment-laden hotspots, there’s something for every type of beach enthusiast on the island. Explore beyond Le Guanahani’s stunningly beautiful Grand-Cul-de-Sac and Marechal beaches to discover St. Barth’s seaside treasures and all they have to offer. Below, local staff members at the hotel share their personal favorites.

Gouverneur Beach

Governeur Beach on St. Barth

According to Le Guanahani Managing Director Martein van Wagenberg, the beach at Gouverneur Bay provides one of the island’s most exclusively idyllic shoreline experiences.

“It has clear waters, soft sand, natural sun protection by sea grape trees, and scooping pelicans,” he says. “It’s your own quiet and private beach in the mornings.”

Because of its remote location, Gouverneur remains relatively untouched compared to other St. Barth beaches. A ten-minute drive southeast from Gustavia, it’s a sanctuary for swimming, sunbathing, or diving into a gratifying beach read. While parking here is easy to find and close to the beach, there are no facilities available, so it may be a good idea to bring along water and chairs.

From its abundant wildlife to the mountains that plunge into the sea on either side of the white strip of sand, the bay shimmers with natural beauty. Find the rocks on its east side for spectacular snorkeling conditions. And looking seaward from the beach, visitors can savor resplendent views of neighboring Saba, St. Eustatius, and St. Kitts rising in the background.

Read full article blog.leguanahani.com

Emergency aid pours into the Bahamas following Dorian’s destruction

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Cruise ships, charities and international relief organizations are rushing to deliver aid to the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian battered the Caribbean country, leaving at least 76,000 people in need of urgent support, according to the United Nations.

The state of play: Dorian has destroyed at least 13,000 homes and led to extensive flooding in the Abaco Islands, believed to have contaminated wells with saltwater, and resulted in “an urgent need for clean water,” per the International Red Cross. The rush to provide aid to the country has begun with numerous organizations and individuals offering to donate goods and resources.

The cost of the damages: Preliminary estimates value damages in the billions of dollars for the Bahamas.

Who has helped:

  • The UN arranged for 8 tons of food to be sent to the Bahamas Sept. 5 as part of a $5.4 million overall funding package. A UN hub in Panama is also preparing an airlift to drop off storage units, generators and and more.
  • USAID is on the ground in the Bahamas after the Trump administration requested “airlift and logistics support” from the Defense Department, reports the Miami Herald. The agency has delivered food and water.

Read full article here.

Sustainable Seafood

Sustainable Seafood
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Oistins. Friday night. Enjoying some delicious local fish? Bridgetown Fish Complex. Saturday morning. Choosing some fresh local fish to cook for Sunday lunch? Chances are that close to ¾ of the ‘local’ fish that you are buying and consuming is not even local. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, approximately 70% of seafood consumed in Barbados is imported.

The fisheries sector, one of the established sectors within the Blue Economy is important for employment, livelihoods and food security. Barbados has a history and culture strongly linked to fish with fishing and associated activities having been integral components of the social and economic fabric of Barbados for years. Approximately 8,000 people are employed in this sector which accounts for ~6% of the labour force with over 1,000 active fishing vessels. Bajans also eat a lot of fish with consumption per capita being very high in the Caribbean region.

However in recent years, annual catches have declined with marine capture production being between 2000 – 2500 tonnes of fish, with flying fish, dolphin fish and yellowfin tuna contributing to the majority of landings. Lower catches and high imports are not the only threats that the fishing industry faces. In addition, overfishing and unsustainable fishing, land based and marine sources of pollution, coastal development and loss of coral reefs, changes in climate and the introduction of invasive species such as lionfish and the influx of sargassum further threaten the fisheries sector.

Read Full Article Here

Retirement on a Caribbean island can cost as little as $24,000 a year

Caribbean Retirement
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If your idea of the ideal permanent getaway includes clear turquoise water and white sand beaches, consider these five Caribbean islands.

You can enjoy a relaxing retirement for just $36,000 a year – and that’s on the high end. A report from InternationalLiving.com says these five island locales are beautiful, accessible and, most of all, affordable on an income that’s in line with the average monthly Social Security check for a couple.

For an idea of prices for rent, restaurants, groceries and other daily items, try the calculators on Numbeo or Expatistan. Price data may not be available for some areas.

  • 1. Ambergris Caye, Belize

    No longer just a sleepy Caribbean hideaway, the largest island in Belize has a dynamic community. Ambergris Caye is the most popular spot for expats in Belize, according to Escape Artist, a resource for people looking to live abroad. The Belize Barrier Reef, half a mile from shore, draws fishermen and divers.

    Two domestic airlines – Tropic Air and Maya Island Air – have frequent flights to the island from Belize City, so getting to Ambergris is easy. You can also reach the island by water taxi.

    A three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant will set you back $55, according to Numbeo. On a monthly budget of $2,900, or $34,800 a year, a couple can enjoy a comfortable retirement in Ambergris Caye, including rent for a house or apartment. If you own a home, expats report it’s possible for a couple to live quite comfortably on less than $24,000 a year.

    Read full article on CNBC.com

6th Annual Toga Animal House Party, St. Croix, 25 Aug 2019

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ST. CROIX, USVI 🇻🇮 It’s time to get your Togo’s together! Our 6th Annual Toga Animal House Party for the Animal Welfare Center is on Sunday, August 25 with Kurt Schindler and Adrian Rogers sponsored by Mutiny Vodka!

Help us help the homeless animals on St. Croix by participating in the Toga Animal. House Party’s 2019 B / S ( Bartender/ Server) SUMMER GAMES on August 25. Call or text me 340 690-4780 for more info or call AWC 340 778-1650.

See flyer below for details on HOW TO PARTICIPATE…

NewDeepEnd.com is featured on CoolestCarib.com

5 Best Caribbean Islands to Live On

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Mention the word “Caribbean” and most people think of places like Aruba, the Turks and Caicos, the Bahamas, and other tourist-rich dollops of sand. The region conjures well-deserved images of crystal-clear waters and white-sand beaches.

And there’s no question: If you like sun and sand, these islands are great for a vacation. But move there? Most folks assume it’s just too expensive and don’t give it another thought.

But that’s too bad. Because the Caribbean is bigger than many people realize. And when you look beyond the mass-market shores the tourist brochures describe, you’ll find a variety of sun-splashed islands well worth your attention. They’re not only beautiful… but a lot more affordable than most people realize.

Belize, Nicaragua, Honduras, and Mexico all offer islands off their Caribbean coasts—islands that share the same turquoise-blue waters and powder-white beaches you expect when you hear “Caribbean”—only you won’t pay a fortune to live on any of them.

Read full article here

Top 7 Ways to Support Sustainable Fashion

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Shopping is often referred to as “retail therapy.” Some suggest buying stuff, especially new clothes, can make you feel better — more relaxed, perhaps, or prettier or popular. While shopping for the latest trendy fashions may boost your mood temporarily, most people agree the positive vibes seldom last long.

Even if they did, there is more to modern fashion than meets the eye. Underneath all the glitz and glam portrayed in store windows are layers of what a new BBC documentary refers to as “fashion’s dirty secrets.”

If you think turning over your wardrobe frequently has little impact on world events, you may want to take an hour to watch the film. From start to finish, it will compel you to seriously consider how the fashion industry is actually wreaking havoc on the environment and endangering human health.

BBC Reporter Suggests Our Clothes Are Wrecking the Planet

In the featured 2018 documentary, BBC investigative reporter Stacey Dooley unearths some of the fashion industry’s “dirty secrets.”1 Her conclusion: Our clothes are wrecking the planet. At the onset of the film, Dooley is quick to admit she is a fan of fashion.

Read full article on Articles.Mercola.com

 

The Value of having a Farmers Market Within the Community

Organic Caribbean Urban Farms
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Everybody benefits from supporting their local farmers market. It’s easy to do, especially when the market has multiple vendors offering a good variety and is close to your home. When you support your local farmers’ market, you are supporting something much greater than you imagine.

The Fiber of the Community

Local farmers markets have the unique ability to bring locals together by providing a lively, family friendly environment that everyone can enjoy.

Local produce; crafts; vegan, vegetarian, and mainstream food options; desserts; clothing and more can be found at your local farmers market. In a way it should be called a Community market as it represents a segment of your town coming together offering their best products for everyone to consume and enjoy.

Business Incubators

Building the local economy begins at the farmers market. New small businesses often begin their journey here in order to test the market with their products. The level of success many of them find at the market will decide if they go on to open a local store front. The merchants that move to a brick and mortar space will look to hire local help. This is something that often gets overlooked but is very important to keep in mind as you support your local farmers market. The success of the small business merchants will spill over to the economical success of your town.

Tourist Attraction

Tourist will come from far and wide to visit your town because of your beautiful beaches, your beautiful rivers or your grand mountains. One way of exposing tourists to the local people and culture is through the farmers markets.

Tourists often look to find the local farmers markets and see for themselves the produce and arts that are not necessarily available at your traditional malls. These folks want to take as much as they can from their experience in your town and what better way to do so than at the local, friendly farmers’ market.

One more attraction for tourists are local farms which gives your guests a refreshing perspective on how food is grown locally. We wrote a blog post on the tours we offer of our urban farm and we were amazed on how many great friends we made thanks to them.

Better Prices

Way too often the price point is overlooked. Local products, especially produce are immune to the price shifts in the general market as they are transported a very short distance to arrive at their destination.

Read Full Article on RossiNaturals.com

Why Bamboo Is the Perfect Alternative to Plastic

Bamboo is extremely sustainable
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Why are we saying goodbye to plastic straws, single-use plastic and other unsustainable materials? Not only will plastic products outlive us, but they will outlive generations to come. The demand we place on unsustainable materials like plastic has led to the development of a fossil fuel-dependent economy. Here are 5 ways bamboo makes the perfect green alternative by fighting climate change!

Article by Caribamboo.com

WHY BAMBOO?

1. SEQUESTERS CARBON

Bamboo releases 30% more oxygen into the atmosphere compared to other plants. It also absorbs more carbon dioxide. As a result, bamboo greatly decreases the amount of greenhouse gases and cleans the air! Once ready to harvest, it’s more environmentally friendly to cut bamboo down to make sustainable products. This avoids carbon being released into the atmosphere when it dies.

2. REDUCES PRESSURE ON FOREST RESOURCES

Bamboo is the world’s fastest growing plant. As a result, it’s ready to be harvested annually and sustainably after four to five years. Typical hardwood takes many years longer to mature and can be harvested only once! Once harvested, bamboo can produce a vast range of sustainable goods including straws, textiles, furniture, construction, tissue and paper products.

3. HELPS FARMERS ADAPT TO CLIMATE CHANGE

Climate change is causing new growing conditions. As a result, farmers have to adapt their management and harvesting practices. Bamboo’s rapid growth allow frequent harvesting, which means less exposure to disaster.

 

4. RESTORES DEGRADED LAND

By planting bamboo, we can help restore land degraded by deforestation. This is due to several reasons including: bamboo’s effectiveness as a windbreak and its ability to thrive on problem soils and land unsuitable for other crops. The plant therefore offers an outstanding opportunity to replace non-sustainable technologies.

READ FULL ARTICLE AT Caribamboo.com