7 Best Caribbean Islands for Couples

Seven Best Caribbean Islands to visit
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By CoolestCarib.com

A couple walking on a dock in one of the best Caribbean islands, the Bahamas.

When it comes to couple getaways, we have choices and choices. But, when it comes to the romantic heavens of earth, Caribbean islands are hard to beat. There is something about these islands that makes them mystic and marvelous, something that makes everyone put them on their traveling wish lists. And the best part about the Caribbean is that there is something for every kind of couple. For instance, in the Bahamas, you can participate in all sorts of wonderful activities that will take your breath away, and in St. Lucia, you can say that you are in your own paradise.

One thing is for sure—in the Caribbean, you will walk on the softest sand, swim in the bluest waters, eat the most delicious food, and simply have the time of your life. But you already know that. What you do not know is which Caribbean island to go to. We will help you out—here are the 7 best Caribbean islands for couples. 

1.  St. Lucia 

One of the best Caribbean islands for couples has to be the island of St. Lucia. Everything here is perfect. Wherever you look, you will see mesmerizing scenery—beaches, forests, resorts, etc., all look like they are from another world. Because of that fact, staying on this island is extremely expensive. But, you know what they say – best things always come with a hefty price tag. However, we are sure that you will not regret coming to this luxurious romantic getaway with your significant other. 

A couple holding hands on the beach.
You and your partner will fall in love even more while vacationing in St. Lucia.

2. Cuba 

Remember those amazing-looking postcards from the Caribbean with beautiful people, wonderful architecture, palm trees, cocktails, and pastel-colored cars? All those postcards are from Cuba. And, let us tell you something—Cuba looks even more beautiful and even more vibrant in person.

But, what makes it vibrant are not only the resorts, no. Cuba is all about different cultures—cultures of people with different backgrounds, languages, customs, dress codes, foods, drinks, and so much more. So, if you and your partner decide to come to Cuba, do not be lazy and stay only in the resort. Find a guide who will take you downtown—that is where you will see the essence of Cuba. 

3. Jamaica 

Another very familiar postcard is the one with cabins on the water. Yes, that too can be found in the Caribbean islands, specifically in Jamaica. It is here where you can book a stay in a cabin over the water—a cabin where you can touch the warm sea while you are lying in your bed. And a cabin from which you will have the most mesmerizing views of the sunrise and the sunset.

These cabins are a part of many resorts. Still, you do not need to worry about your privacy—you and your partner will have your own little piece of heaven without anyone interrupting you. The only time you will be interrupted is when waiters come to bring your romantic dinner, flowers, and candles. 

Cabins over the sea.
It doesn’t get more romantic than Jamaica.

4. Guadeloupe 

Guadeloupe has only recently become one of the best Caribbean islands for couples. Do not get us wrong—this island (that is, this group of 5 islands) has always been mesmerizing. However, it was little-known among tourists. Nowadays, it is a hotspot for all people looking for luxury experiences, romantic getaways, and vacations that will not end up costing an arm and a leg.

Yes, believe it or not, Guadeloupe is still very affordable. Things like accommodation, restaurants, local shopping, transportation, and similar—all come relatively cheap. This is what makes this island so desired even by ex-pats. So, if you visit this island, if you fall in love with it, and if you decide to stay for good—moving to the Caribbean, that is, moving to Guadeloupe can be easily arranged! There are countless options for properties that are reasonably priced and will afford you a lifetime of amazing views and fun in the sun.

5. One of the Best Caribbean Islands—Tobago 

Not a lot of people know about Tobago. They find out about its existence only after they visit its sister island, Trinidad. Maybe that is a good thing—secluded and uncrowned islands are a perfect getaway for couples. But, this island is not your typical resort. Tobago is still wild! It is full of lush beaches, tropical forests, hills, and mountains. That is, Tobago is meant for adventure and adrenaline rushes and not for luxury and expensive hotels. However, if you ask us, lush vegetation is also what makes a certain place luxurious. 

6. The Bahamas 

We just have to mention another postcard – the one with swimming pigs! No, that was is photoshopped—that is something you can experience in the Bahamas. But, of course, there is so much more to the Bahamas than taking a swim with cute pigs. For instance, here is where you can experience walking on the softest and the whitest sand in the world. And, it is where you can swim in the warmest and cleanest waters in the world. So, let us ask you—is there a better reason for visiting the Bahamas? Probably not! This is one of those best Caribbean islands for couples that you should definitely not miss out on. 

A pig swimming.
One thing is for sure—The Bahamas will equip you with memories for life.

7. St. Barths 

We can’t finish our story of the best Caribbean islands for couples without mentioning the famous island of St. Barths. Even though this island is tiny, it is full of amazing resorts. However, just like St. Lucia, vacationing at St. Barths will also come with a hefty price tag—there is a reason why this small piece of land is called the land for the rich. Here is where all those most luxurious resorts and hotels can be found. And, let us not forget about golf courses, tennis courts, private trails., etc. You can find all of that and more in St. Barths. So if you and your loved one want to experience luxury, and if you want to see how rich and famous tend to vacation, consider booking your trip to St. Barths. 

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Photos Credit:

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Top 10 Foods To Try in the Caribbean

Caribbean Food
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By CoolestCarib.com.

A Caribbean Beach

Are you planning to visit the Caribbean? Well, you are in for a treat – literary! The group of islands that we call the Caribbean has an abundance of mesmerizing beaches, cities, cultures, and people and an abundance of treats to try. Some of them are pretty popular, and some will surprise you. Each island in the Caribbean has its specialty that you have to try – and that will be our topic of the day. We will share the top 10 foods to try in the Caribbean the next time you visit.

1. Jerk Chicken – Jamaica 

Ex-pats love Jamaica. Some are here for those must-see beaches in Jamaica, and some are here for the food. And, when it comes to food, one dish can be tasted everywhere – jerk chicken. It is a national dish in Jamaica, and, thus, it is one of those foods to try in the Caribbean. Jerk chicken is marinated in a mixture of spicy and sweet ingredients that will melt in your mouth. It is often served with rice and peas and, of course, beer.

Jerk chicken on the grill
When in the Caribbean – eat what locals eat.

2. Coucou and Flying Fish – Barbados 

Did you know that Barbados is often called the Land of Flying Fish? That is because of their same-named national dish – Coucou and flying fish. This fish is caught in the warm waters around the island, and it has a unique flavor. Most ex-pats swear that this fish tastes like nothing they have eaten before. So, if you ever find yourself in Barbados, be sure to try it. You can find it everywhere – cooks serve it on the beach, in markets, and in restaurants. There are two types of preparations – steaming and frying- and with both, you get the same side dish which consists of polenta-like cornmeal and various vegetables.

3. Fungee and Pepperpot – Antigua and Barbuda

The country of Antigua and Barbuda has become very popular not only among tourists but also among newcomers who decided to make this place home. Antigua and Aruba have many great things to offer – beautiful beaches, crystal clear waters, friendly people, and a laid-back lifestyle.

So, if you too decide to move here, a great way to adapt is to try the local specialty. Thus, as soon as your international movers unload your belongings and you settle in, ask the locals where to try the best fungee and pepperpot – a type of bread, similar to polenta in texture, served with a rich stew of vegetables.

4. Crab & Callaloo – Trinidad & Tobago

This country which consists of two islands, is where you can try the best creole cuisine. Don’t miss out on the crab and callaloo dish if you find yourself here! It is one of those foods to try in the Caribbean as soon as you arrive. Locals make this dish by cooking the crab meat into a sauce called callaloo. This sauce is made of leafy green vegetables, lime, and plenty of spices. 

5. Mofongo – Puerto Rico

All people who have been to Puerto Rico claim that what they love the most about the island is the taste and smell of Mofongo. The recipe for Mofongo usually goes like this: green plantains that are mashed and seasoned with garlic, and then the pork rinds are added. You can eat it both as a side and main dish, and you can eat it any time you want. Locals usually have it for lunch. Moreover, for locals, Mofongo is more than a dish – it is a part of their history that they like to remember when they all gather over a meal. A restaurant in Puerto Rico well known for their Mofongos is Cafe Berlin in Old San Juan.

A Puerto Rican man.
Locals will be more than happy to advise you where to buy the best Mofongo.

6. La Bandera – Dominican Republic 

Dominicans claim they have the best version of Mofongo, but that is still not their national dish. So, if you want to try something really Dominican – try La Bandera. It is a ‘working-class’ type of lunch, but be sure that everyone here loves it. It consists of rice, beans, meat, and a seasoned salad. 

7. Conch Fritters – Bahamas

There are many reasons to visit the Bahamas – the best scenery, relaxation, and adventure. But another great reason to visit this mesmerizing place is its food. Of course, you can try all sorts of foods here and cuisines from all over the world because some of the best chefs ever are right here. But, it would be a shame to come to the Bahamas and not try their national dish – Conch Fritters. Conch is a type of a snail placed in a batter made of flour, coconut milk, onions, papers, celery, and various spices and then deep-fried.

8. Creole Bread – St. Lucia 

Creole Bread is a local treat that you can find in all family-owned bakeries across the romantic island of St. Lucia. This bread looks similar to a baguette, but its taste is quite different. Locals mix it with certain spices (sometimes even with coconut milk) and then bake it in a wood-fired oven. It is best to get this bread while still steaming and eat it while watching the St. Lucia’s sunset.

A woman sitting in a deck chair and watching the Caribbean sunset
Eating while watching the Caribbean sunset should be a thing on your bucket list.

9. Goat Water – Montserrat

Don’t let the name of this dish fool you. Goat Water is not a drink! It is a dish made of goat meat sprinkled with spices and herbs and then served with papaya and rice or bread. This dish is a staple on Montserrat Island, and it is often made during family celebrations or as a comfort meal.

10. Stewed Salt Fish with Dumplings – St Kitts & Nevis

The last of the exciting foods to try in the Caribbean on our list is salt fish and dumplings. Salt fish is stewed in an abundance of water and coconut milk, and then different vegetables and spices are added as a seasoning. Once everything is cooked, spicy dumplings, plantains, and breadfruit are added. This dish, too, is one of those things you can try in family restaurants. Make sure to give it a try – you will remember its taste forever.

More Caribbean info go to CoolestCarib.com

Top 10 Mega Projects in the Caribbean 2021. Game-Changer

Caribbean Game Changer
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Will these Caribbean mega projects be a game changer? Ultimately enhancing the standard of living of people living in the Caribbean. Caribbean Governments & private investors are eager to steer the region away from depending on hotel tourism to adopting modern technology and creating technical jobs for graduates and returning residents (expats). Which project really inspires you the most?

Video and text posted on Youtube by Caribbean Villa Life

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Attention Snowbirds – Caribbean Travel 2021

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“It’s Christmas in the Caribbean, snowbirds fill the air…
We don’t get in a hurry, we send away for mistletoe…
Christmas in the Caribbean,
We’ve got everything but snow!” Jimmy Buffet.

That should have most American or Canadian snowbirds as soon as they read – “We’ve got everything but snow!” On top of that, it’s also hello, end of the year or all years! We’ve had our hair down all year during lock downs and quarantines. Now there is snow and it’s time to get some wind in our hair concurrently with sun on the skin and palm trees flapping in view.

Here’s the low-down on what, where and when for travel to the Caribbean when it gets too cold or gloomy back home.

First, take note of PCR Test requirements before you , of course.

PCR test requirements – most Caribbean islands are requiring that the traveler present a negative PCR test result to enter the destination. Several are now accepting rapid result antigen tests.

Where to Spend a Sunny Christmas ’20?

Most Caribbean islands have reopened to tourism. Below is a list of Caribbean islands and regions that you can travel to now, and what the requirements are. These updates are based on official government announcements, as summarized also on www.wimco.com

Wherever you travel internationally, you will be required to present proof of a negative PCR or Antigen Test, and in several cases you will be required to log on to a travel entry request portal to submit the info in advance.

Riviera Maya, Cozumel & Tulum, Mexico – No testing required for entry, screened for symptoms upon arrival, no quarantine required.

Punta Cana, Cap Cana & Casa de Campo, Dominican Republic – No testing required to enter, random screening of arrivals.

St. Barths – PCR or Antigen tests required for entry, within last 3 full days, no portal upload required, no quarantine required. No tests for trips to St Martin/Sint Maarten and Guadeloupe from St. Barths.

Turks & Caicos – PCR test required, within last 5 full days, portal upload required, no quarantine required

British Virgin Islands – PCR test required, with last 5 full days, portal upload required, 4 day quarantine in your villa or hotel , then second test required

US Virgin Islands – PCR test required, within last 5 full days, portal upload required, no quarantine required

St Martin/Sint Maarten – PCR or Antigen tests required, within last 5 full days, portal upload required, no quarantine required

Mustique – PCR test required, within last 5 full days, portal upload required, second rapid test required upon entry, then no quarantine after testing negative

Anguilla – PCR test required for entry, within the last 5 full days, portal upload required, quarantine in your villa or hotel for 10 days, with select excursions and activities allowed if requested first

Bahamas (and associated private islands there) – PCR test required for entry, within the last 5 full days, portal upload required, no quarantine, however second rapid test required after 4 days

Jamaica – PCR or Antigen tests required for entry, within last 10 days, portal upload required, no quarantine required

Barbados – PCR test required for entry, within the last 3 full days, portal upload required, quarantine in your villa or hotel until results from second test are received (within 24-48 hours)

Antigua & Barbuda – PCR test required for entry, with last 7 full days, no portal, 14 day quarantine in place and second test required

Grand Cayman – PCR test required for entry, with last 5 full days, portal upload required, 14 day quarantine and second test required

St Kits and Nevis – PCR test required for entry, with last 3 full days, no portal, 7 day quarantine and second test required

DO NOTE: Reopening dates and entry requirements announced by local governments are subject to change.

Getting There

The TSA is allowing passengers to carry up to 12 ounces of hand sanitizer in a carry-on bag. Many airport restaurants have reduced service to take out, and airlines are encouraging passengers to bring their own food and beverages as in-flight meal service is reduced. Airlines are performing sanitizing “wipe downs” of the planes during change overs.

In Conclusion

So, if you scan through the above you will notice that most islands require a test and/or portal upload or second test followed by quarantine of varying amounts of days. In other words, be prepared to be spending up to 2 weeks in a hotel room in Antigua, for instance. But Barbados seems a bit easier with only up to 2 days quarantine until results from a second test is received. It really depends on you.

For that matter, skip all this and go to Cozumel/Riviera Maya/Tulum area in Mexico or the Dominican Republic. Public Health minister, Rafael Sánchez Cárdenas, stated that there are no requirements for entry, no testing is required, and there is no quarantine for vacationers planning to stay in villas or hotels in Cap Cana, Punta Cana or Casa de Campo (Dominican Republic). You are, however, advised to wear a mask in the airport and to maintain adequate social distancing.

Interestingly, travel to Anguilla allows tourists to leave the (quarantine) villa for certain pre-approved outings such as boat rides and travel to select restaurants. Managing these strict entry procedures does come at a cost.

Source: www.wimco.com

Having stated all the above, there are some doctors who disagree with the main stream narrative. Whatch this video, but we do encourage you to always use common sense and do your own research.

https://brandnewtube.com/embed/qIsNohSIeSgfz2J

7 Remote Islands Viewing Solutions Amidst Government Restrictions on Travel

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So, you’re wondering what it’s like at the beach on a faraway island right now. Who is in the water – that cute guy with the red hair and hockey jock, muscle tower body? Or the kitesurfing girl with the long, curly hair? But. You’re stuck because of travel bans. We know the feeling. 

May we present some remote island viewing solutions.

You can now view webcams of Caribbean island spots in the Virgin Islands on any of your devices right now! 

Even better, why not set the right atmosphere for remote island viewing at home right now? 

Solution 1: Make yourself a fresh Margarita – or any cocktail that you have ingredients for at home. Next, swipe your iPad and find some soft steel drum music or reggae to hum in the background. If you don’t have that ready, may we suggest you listen to Soggy Dollar Radio which streams live worldwide from the Soggy Dollar Bar. One tune and you’ll feel like you’re sitting on the soft sands of White Bay. (See Solution 7 for more info on this world famous party bar.)

Anyway, run a nice bath, add some bubbles and soak in it. Now, bring up an island on your iPad screen – maybe one in the US Virgin Islands like a view of the Caravelle Hotel in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands – and sip away at that home-made cocktail in your hand. 

Solution 2: But now that you’re alone in your bathroom with that Sex on the Beach in your hand, you’re feeling a little lonely, right? Not to worry. If you visit these following links, you’ll realize other people who are probably lonely and watching too will comment on what’s happening at the location you’re viewing. (We’re starting to get the hang of this ‘together alone’ thing now.)

Or mostly, when they are there, virtually, they just connect with whomever is also there at the same time and chatting online via Youtube. Some may use this function to hook up with the closest person willing. 

At this point you may want to swipe to iTunes and find that song that talks about “lov(ing) the one you’re with…”

This webcam seems to be particularly popular in the abovementioned sense:

St. John Spice Webcam – Cruz Bay Ferry Dock, St. John, US Virgin Islands. 

Others – this might or might not be more your style – may use this for the greater good. 

Solution 3: For those who miss getting out and appreciating wildlife, the next best thing could be to check for sea turtles nesting in the middle of the night right where a beach bar was built. Normally beach bars like this come into existence during a season when the sea turtles are not nesting. The next webcam location is a bar and was named after a type of sea turtle, a Leatherback Turtle. Please note, that doesn’t mean the bar was built on a sea turtle nest. But why not just check for live, night roaming sea turtles? Wild life seems to be more rampant during human lockdown anyway. Just keep staring, maybe with a Mud Slide to sip on now? (I couldn’t think of anything more “wildlife” than a drink based on looking like mud…) – Leatherback Landing, Cane Bay, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands:

You may one day even stare at the beach in Cruz Bay, St. John and realise you’re looking at a dolphin – or golly, an alien – doing a jump for the webcam, just to show ‘em! The Beach Bar, Cruz Bay, St. John, US Virgin Islands:

or a live webcam overlooking Schooner Bay in St. Croix, US Virgin Islands:

Solution 4: See calm waters ripple and palm trees flap in an easy, possibly balmy (we hope) breeze. You’re so tired after making that umpteenth sourdough bread or attending that Zoom exercise class, like nearly everybody else was during lockdown. This webcam is basically simply for watching the beautiful ocean as it is at the newest hotel in Frederiksted, The Fred Hotel, Restaurant & Bar, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands:

Solution 5: Since you can’t physically be at a party in the Virgin Islands right now, what you can do is click on this webcam of downtown Christiansted, St. Croix – which normally is the location for a party, provided it’s not under the influence of a pandemic or hurricane. This link may help on a Friday or Saturday night as many concerts and parties happen in this area. Also, just so you can check and see that everyone else, even at a notorious party place, is also not partying. 

Caravelle Hotel & Casino Concert Cam, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands:

Solution 6: Worried about your career – like mostly everyone else in the world – and whether anyone else is mingling with potential business contacts and not you? Well, check out the remote view of 5 star, Buccaneer Hotel – that potential client you’ve been wanting to approach with your business card might be playing golf or tennis again right now or in the next week – Buccaneer Beach and Golf Resort, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands. At least you can know now how often and when he normally plays tennis or golf there. 

Solution 7: Make a list of all these locations and venues for when the travel ban lifts. That way you will immediately know where and when to go in the Virgin Islands. When you get there, and the travel bans are now slowly lifting, you may also be in a boat party mood. Therefore, you shouldn’t miss a remote view of the famous Soggy Dollar Bar in Joost van Dyk now. I mean, you have to check where is the best spot to dock your boat. If you have a boat. Or if your friend has a boat. Or if your friend has a friend with a boat. Or if your boat has a friend.  Soggy Dollar Bar – Jost Van Dyke, White Bay, British Virgin Islands.

How to get there? No worries, we’ve got you covered. You can rent a boat like the Caribbean Blue Boat Charters. They can take you from St. Thomas to the British Virgin Islands, just be sure to bring your passport. 

Future proofing Caribbean tourism

Future proofing Caribbean tourism
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The statistics vary, but reliable Caribbean and international entities suggest that the region’s tourism sector is now delivering on average directly and indirectly about 40.6 percent of the Caribbean’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP), although, in Aruba, Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados, The Bahamas, the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), and most overseas territories tourism, the figure is much higher.

Detailed country by country analysis and statistics produced by the International Monetary Fund (IMF) suggest that sustaining the contribution tourism makes has become critical to the long-term economic stability of almost every Caribbean nation other than Trinidad and Tobago, Suriname, and Guyana.

Despite this, little thought has been given to how to future proof the industry as disruptive technologies take their toll, the region’s largely sun, sea and sand high-volume offering becomes subject to multiple global pressures likely to affect traveller sentiment and international competition increases.

Read full article at Caribbean News Global

The Caribbean Shows the Way to a Renewable Future

The Caribbean Shows the Way to a Renewable Future
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Falling energy storage costs and sophisticated control systems are allowing renewables to be the backbone of some Caribbean nations—and providing lessons for mainlands.

GTM Creative Strategies

The Caribbean Shows the Way to a Renewable Future
Photo Credit: Wärtsilä Energy

In the span of just a few years, the focus at the annual Caribbean Electric Utility Services Corporation conference has shifted from issues around producing electricity from thermal capacity — usually oil — to what blend of renewable options constitutes the best path forward.

It is not just a theoretical question for the future, says Risto Paldanius, director of business development for Wärtsilä’s Energy Storage and Optimization business unit, a longtime attendee of the conference.

“It has clearly shifted, and now that the [levelized cost of energy, or LCOE] for renewables is on par or lower than any thermal generation, it’s all about solar and wind,” said Paldanius. “Then the questions become how to achieve the 100 percent renewable future everyone is talking about without causing disturbances in the grid and effectively managing solar ramp rates and generation optimization.”

They are not questions rooted only in environmental sustainability; they also address life-saving resiliency, as seen with storms that have battered communities and their power grids on many islands with devastating outcomes in the past two years, including in Puerto Rico, the Bahamas and Anguilla.

Read full article on greentechmedia.com


Related advertisements in the Caribbean

Carib Solar Tech is located in St. Thomas US Virgin Islands.
Drive Green VI is located in St. Thomas US Virgin Islands

15 Things You Need to Know Before You Go to the Caribbean

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The Caribbean region is a tropical paradise, but there are things you need to know before you embark on your next sunny holiday to make sure everything runs smoothly.

Palm trees, sandy beaches, turquoise waters, great music… you’ll find all that, and more, throughout the Caribbean. Most islands are easy to get to, and easy to vacation at, but even so, there are some things every traveler needs to know before going to the Caribbean. These helpful tips will help you decide when and where to go, what to expect when you’re there, and what you might like to do.

1 OF 15

Bring Your Passport… and U.S. Dollars

You’ll need a valid passport to enter any of the Caribbean islands—and to re-enter the United States—except for Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Most non-U.S. islands also require a return or ongoing airline ticket. But don’t worry about the local currency. U.S. dollars—but not coins—are widely accepted everywhere. Bring small bills, though, as you’ll almost always get change in local money—including from an ATM. Actually, there are 13 different currencies in the Caribbean: The Bahamas, Barbados, the Eastern Caribbean islands, Cayman Islands, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago all have their own dollars; Cuba and the Dominican Republic have pesos; the French islands use euros; the Dutch islands have guilders, although Aruba uses florin; and then there’s the Haitian gourde.

02_ThingsToKnowBeforeYouGoCaribbean__EnglishIsWidelySpoken_shutterstock_1390883867
PHOTO: fokke baarssen/Shutterstock

2 OF 15

English Is Widely Spoken

English is commonly understood, spoken, and written throughout the Caribbean, although French is the preferred language on Guadeloupe, Martinique, St. Barth, St. Martin, and Haiti. You’ll also hear a French-Creole patois spoken in Jamaica, Saint Lucia, St. Vincent, Grenada, and Haiti. On the Dutch islands, you’ll hear both Dutch and English spoken, while Papiamento (which adds Spanish, Portuguese, French, African, and Arawakan elements to the Dutch/English mix) is the local patois in Aruba, Bonaire, and Curaçao. Spanish, of course, is the most prevalent language in the Dominican Republic and Cuba; but in Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory, Spanish and English are both official languages. All of that said, English-speakers should have no problem understanding or being understood in the Caribbean.

Read full article on www.fodors.com

Top Caribbean Ecotourism Destinations

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Travelers tend to think of all Caribbean islands as verdant and lush, but some Caribbean destinations are decidedly “greener” than others. Dominica, for example, has a well-earned reputation as the Nature Island of the Caribbean, while Bonaire is known for its pristine marine environment and Costa Rica and Belize are among the top eco-friendly travel locales in the world. As for eco-resorts, the ones selected here boast low-impact integration with the native environment, commitment to reduced energy use and/or renewable energy, and activities that support and foster knowledge of the local ecosystem.

01 of 06

Dominica

Dominica, Delices. Two people jump into the plunge pool at the foot of Victoria Fals.
Nick Ledger / Getty Images

Dominica benefits from its marvelous biodiversity, and has chosen to make ecotourism (and the conservation and preservation practices that go along with it) the foundation of its economic development. Dominica has lush jungles for hiking and mysterious rivers for exploring, and visitors can meet Carib Indians and even walk in the footsteps of Capt. Jack Sparrow — some of the wilder scenes in the Pirates of the Caribbean movies were filmed here.

With a focus on renewable energy as well as self-sustaining energy, Dominica’s eco-friendly resorts and lodgings continue to expand as the island moves more and more towards 100% energy efficiency.

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St. John, U.S. Virgin Islands

Maho Bay, St. John
Matt Wade/CC BY SA 2.0

Americans are not generally known for their restraint when it comes to development, so St. John in the U.S. Virgin Islands is a pleasant surprise. Just twenty square miles, the island is devoted primarily to National Parks, and has some of the best beaches and finest snorkeling in the world. Most of the eco-resorts here are modest, more akin to campgrounds than resorts, generally speaking, but great locations for those looking to appreciate the natural environment in a quiet, more off-the-grid setting.

Read full article on Tripsavvy.com

Retirement on a Caribbean island can cost as little as $24,000 a year

Caribbean Retirement

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If your idea of the ideal permanent getaway includes clear turquoise water and white sand beaches, consider these five Caribbean islands.

You can enjoy a relaxing retirement for just $36,000 a year – and that’s on the high end. A report from InternationalLiving.com says these five island locales are beautiful, accessible and, most of all, affordable on an income that’s in line with the average monthly Social Security check for a couple.

For an idea of prices for rent, restaurants, groceries and other daily items, try the calculators on Numbeo or Expatistan. Price data may not be available for some areas.

  • 1. Ambergris Caye, Belize

    No longer just a sleepy Caribbean hideaway, the largest island in Belize has a dynamic community. Ambergris Caye is the most popular spot for expats in Belize, according to Escape Artist, a resource for people looking to live abroad. The Belize Barrier Reef, half a mile from shore, draws fishermen and divers.

    Two domestic airlines – Tropic Air and Maya Island Air – have frequent flights to the island from Belize City, so getting to Ambergris is easy. You can also reach the island by water taxi.

    A three-course meal for two in a mid-range restaurant will set you back $55, according to Numbeo. On a monthly budget of $2,900, or $34,800 a year, a couple can enjoy a comfortable retirement in Ambergris Caye, including rent for a house or apartment. If you own a home, expats report it’s possible for a couple to live quite comfortably on less than $24,000 a year.

    Read full article on CNBC.com